Tag Archives: Media harassment

Nicaragua keeping canal plans under wraps

One thing that remains constant with governments such as those in Nicaragua and Venezuela, the government does like to control things.

The Committee to Protect Journalists now reports that details of the massive — as in US$50 billion — canal project are hard to find. In fact, it was even hard for reporters to attend the gala groundbreaking ceremony in December. (Reporters covering Nicaragua waterway project obstructed by lack of information)

Government officials told [journalists] to wait in a Managua hotel for a bus that would transport them to the ribbon-cutting ceremony, according to the Nicaragua Dispatch. But the bus never showed up. Tim Rogers, editor of the online news outlet, said that journalists who traveled to the Pacific coast site on their own were turned back by police.

To be honest no one should be surprised that the Ortega govenrment is being tight lipped about the project.

First, it is not in the nature of the Sandanista governments (and Ortega in particular) to be too enamoured with the idea of public scrutiny of government projects.

Second, the Sandinistas — like their patrons in Venezuela — have no great love for free and independent media.

Third, let’s face it , governments in the region in general are not hospitable to having people looking too closely at how money is spent.

And lastly, the partner in the canal is a firm that has an office in Hong Kong but whose founder is all up close and tight with Chinese state industries.

So you have a nice coalition putting the canal together by people who really don’t think it is anyone’s business but their own to know what is going on.

Given the global financial and political implications of another canal cutting through Central America, I would think there would be more pressure from U.S. and European business groups, governments and media outlets to see the paperwork on the building of this new canal.

Remember how conservatives in the U.S. got all hot and bothered when the Panama Canal was returned to Panama? Besides the whole “We stole it fair and square” stuff, they were also going crazy because Hong Kong businessman Li Ka Shing won the contract to handle the ports on either end.

Screams of how the Chinese communists were taking over the canal were heard across the land.  Unfortunately for the screamers, Li is no communist. He is from Hong Kong — a place Heritage Foundations loves for its economic freedom — and has no love for the rulers in Beijing. (In fact, Li is moving a lot of his holdings from Hong Kong to Bermuda. That should say something about how “lcommunist” he is.)

So now here comes a company, also registered in Hong Kong, but whose CEO is all about mainland China.

So, where are the stories? At least stories about how much we don’t know about the project.

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Filed under China, Freedom of access, Central America

Nothing sheepish expected from Chinese censors

The Hong Kong chief executive wants Hong Kongers to emulate the zodiac animal for this year. No surprise given the pressure CY Leung is under from Beijing.

The same could be said for the way Beijing wants the people of China to act as well. And leave it to the government and party aparatus to serve as shepards.

The ruling elite in China has the attitude that they know what is best and everyone else should just shut up and follow orders. It is such an intregal part of the way they work, they cannot seem to think of any other way to operate.

So while the people are to be sheep, the govenrment will act as both shepard and wolf.

And now, from Foreign Policy a prediction for the Year of the Sheep: Five Predictions for Chinese Censorship in the Year of the Sheep

  1. Tightening of the Great Firewall
  2. WeChat Arrests
  3. Intensified censorship during Pres. Xi’s visit to USA in September
  4. More arrests and jail time for dissidents and free speech activists.
  5. Stepped up pressure on the free media in Hong Kong.

To be honest, these are the same predictions one could make about the state of freedom of press/expression in China every year.

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Filed under Censorship, China, Harassment, Hong Kong, Press Freedom

Jailed Turkish TV Chief Calls For End Of Campaign Against Free Press

There is little I can add to this piece by Roy Greenslade at the Guardian. Just click on the headline and read the piece.

Arrested Turkish TV chief writes an open letter from his jail cell

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Filed under Censorship, Harassment, Press Freedom

China: Not exactly a rule of law place

ANGELA KÖCKRITZ, a correspondent for Die Zeit describes the hell she and her Chinese assistant were put through by Chinese authorities. None of it should suprise anyone, except those who think things really have changed in the way the Chinese government operates.

How my assistant got into trouble with Beijing’s security apparatus and I got to know the Chinese authorities 

This is the really scary part of the story: “Zhang Miao is a completely normal Chinese citizen. And we will treat her like we deal with Chinese citizens.”

Believe me, that is not something to make one feel comfortable.

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Filed under Censorship, China, Harassment, Press Freedom

House and work of Hong Kong pro-democracy firebombed

Two attacks took place against Jimmy Lai, owner of Next Media in Hong Kong.

The attackers tossed Molotov cocktails at Lai’s house and office.

Lai is a well-known supporter of the pro-democracy movement in Hong Kong and a vocal critic of Beijing.

Here are some stories about the attack:

 

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Filed under Harassment, Hong Kong, Press Freedom

New map on impunity for Mexico and Brazil

Once again proof that all it takes is some encouragement and a few — VERY FEW — bucks to put together a major effort to expose violations of human rights, including freedom of speech and press.

Advocacy groups in Mexico and Brazil map attacks on journalists to counteract threats

The crowd-sourced maps will help journalists know more about the risks they might face as the enter an area before they start “doing journalism.”

The Mexican map — Perriodistas en Riesgo — was created in 2012 and focuses on where journalists are under threat.

According to the Knight Center:

Attacks are divided into four categories: physical, psychological, digital and legal. Each category can then be modified by multiple subcategories. For example, a physical attack could be a kidnapping, beating, disappearance, murder, etc, and one attack, such as a reporter being mugged and having his cellphone and laptop stolen, could be categorized as a physical and a digital attack.

The Brazilian map — Violacoes a Liberdade de Expressao – casts a much wider net. It only started in November 2014 but does look at all forms of violations of freedom of expressions, including attacks on journalists and legal proceedings designed to silence human rights advocates.

The items on the Brazilian site are confirmed by Article 19 before being posted to the site.

 

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Filed under Harassment, Killings, Mexico, South America

Catching up: Chinese president says press had it coming

Chinese president Xi Jinping was forced to take an unscripted question from a Western reporter during President Obama’s visit to China last month.

After first seemingly ignoring the question, Xi doubled back to address the issue raised of visas for Western journalists by the reporter.

Mark Lander of the New York Times reported:

After first taking an unrelated, clearly scripted, question from a state-owned Chinese paper — which drew a quizzical facial expression from Mr. Obama — Mr. Xi circled back, declaring that the visa problems of the news organizations, including The Times, were of their own making.

Mr. Xi insisted that China protected the rights of news media organizations but that they needed to abide by the rules of the country. “When a certain issue is raised as a problem, there must a reason,” he said, evincing no patience for the news media’s concerns about being penalized for unfavorable news coverage of Chinese leaders and their families.

So basically Xi’s excuse for not issuing visas to Western reporters is the same excuse a husband gives when accused of beating his wife: It was all the other person’s fault.

 

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Filed under Censorship, China, Harassment, Press Freedom