China: Don’t even think of using Google while we change leaders

Once again the leadership in China thinks that having information is dangerous.

Greatfire.org reports that as of November 9, http://www.google.com was blocked in China. Not just slowed down. But full out blocked.

  • The subdomains http://www.google.com, mail.google.com, google-analytics.com, docs.google.com, drive.google.com, maps.google.com, play.google.com and perhaps many more are all currently DNS poisoned in China. Instead of the real IP addresses, any lookups from China to any of these domains result in the following IP: 59.24.3.173. That IP address is located in Korea and doesn’t serve any website at all.
  • This means that none of these websites, including Google Search, currently work in China, unless you have a VPN or other cirumvention tool.
  • Using a DNS server outside of China doesn’t help. A lookup of http://www.google.com to 8.8.8.8 is also distorted, by the Great Firewall.
  • So far you can still access other country versions of Google such as http://www.google.co.uk.

Josh Rogin at Foreign Policy noted:

According to Google’s own online transparency reporting, which provides realtime traffic data for Google sites around the world, a precipitous drop-off of traffic to Google sites began at exactly 5 p.m. China time Nov. 9, and is still ongoing.

The Cable asked Google what was going on and a spokesperson replied simply: “We’ve checked and there’s nothing wrong on our end.”

Note the drop in Google access:

Yep, just can’t trust the people with information that hasn’t been carefully washed and slanted.

By the way, this affects more than just getting information about the change in leadership in China. Considering how large the U.S. trade relationship is with China, perhaps more people in the U.S. should be worried about how easily the Chinese government controls information. Do you really feel comfortable doing business with a place where you can’t get independent verification of vital social, political and economic information?

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Filed under Censorship, China, Freedom of access, International News Coverage

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