Mexican migration to US less push and weaker pull

How about that.

Improving a country’s economy and political systems encourages people to stay in that country.

Building bigger and more deadly fences and adding more guards at the border don’t seem to be the answer.

Better Lives for Mexicans Cut Allure of Going North

American census figures analyzed by the nonpartisan Pew Hispanic Center also show that the illegal Mexican population in the United States has shrunk and that fewer than 100,000 illegal border-crossers and visa-violators from Mexico settled in the United States in 2010, down from about 525,000 annually from 2000 to 2004.

The dynamics changed.

The decision to leave home involves a comparison, a wrenching cost-benefit analysis, and just as a Mexican baby boom and economic crises kicked off the emigration waves in the 1980s and ’90s, research now shows that the easing of demographic and economic pressures is helping keep departures in check.

Over time, the “push” from Mexico because of political instability and the lack of economic opportunities changed.

Over the past 15 years, [Mexico was] once defined by poverty and beaches has progressed politically and economically in ways rarely acknowledged by Americans debating immigration. Even far from the coasts or the manufacturing sector at the border, democracy is better established, incomes have generally risen and poverty has declined.

And, of course, the “pull” from the U.S. changed as our own economy weakened.

But what really changed in Mexico was the realization by the current young generation is that education and not physical labor was their way out of poverty.

Still, education represents the most meaningful change. The census shows that throughout Jalisco, the number of senior high schools or preparatory schools for students aged 15 to 18 increased to 724 in 2009, from 360 in 2000, far outpacing population growth. The Technological Institute of Arandas, where Angel studies engineering, is now one of 13 science campuses created in Jalisco since 2000 — a major reason professionals in the state, with a bachelor’s degree or higher, also more than doubled to 821,983 in 2010, up from 405,415 in 2000.

Similar changes have occurred elsewhere. In the poor southern states of Chiapas and Oaxaca, for instance, professional degree holders rose to 525,874 from 244,322 in 2000.

Maybe now more people will pay attention to the value TO the United States of development programs and educational support in other countries.

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