Tag Archives: Media harassment

Proof censorship is bad for business

The ProPublica headline and story says it all:

Weibo IPO Reveals a Company Struggling With Censorship

Weibo, “China’s Twitter,” started offering shares on NASDAQ yesterday. Its regulatory disclosures reveal a company’s balancing act between censoring too much and too little.

As required under SEC regulations, the company must list for investors potential risks that might affect its share price. Weibo is up front about the risk the Chinese government’s regulation of content poses to its ability so succeed. “Failure to [censor] may subject us to liabilities and penalties and may even result in the temporary blockage or complete shutdown of our online operations.”

Under a section titled “Risks Relating to Doing Business in China,” the company cites as a material risk not being able to censor user content quickly enough for the Chinese government, and describes a three-day period in March 2012 when Weibo disabled commenting completely so censors could “clean up” all content regarding a topic. The company did not disclose the topic but the Wall Street Journal reported in March 2012 that China put temporary restrictions on Sina, Weibo’s parent company, as well as Tencent, a rival microblogging service, and that it was “detaining individuals that it accused of spreading rumors of a coup attempt in Beijing.” That week, according to the Journal story, Sina and Tencent placed identical notices on their web sites, warning users that the ability to comment on posts was being shut down for three days.

Rest of article.

And that does not even take into account the amount of money wasted dealing with rumors because no one trusts the state-run media to fairly report news.

Social media sites offer a chance for people to swap stories, but like the game of “Telephone,” what starts out at the beginning is not  necessarily what comes out at the end. If the Chinese government were really serious about preventing social unrest, it would drop its censorship and let reporters freely and accurately report what is going on. It would also stop blocking open discussions among the people in China.

But then again, that might destabilize the iron grip the Communist party has on everything. They would have to give up power. And that — to them — is too destabilizing and dangerous.

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Filed under Censorship, China, Freedom of Information, International News Coverage, Press Freedom

Not much love for freedom of expression in Turkey

Politics has always been a bare-knuckles and elbows blood sport, but the blood now seems to be from freedom of expression in Turkey.

Reuters: Turkey’s Erdogan threatens Twitter ban as vote looms

Al Jazeera: Turkey’s Erdogan threatens to ban Twitter

Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan threat to shut down Twitter and other social media platforms came after audio recordings were posted on social media exposing corruption in his inner circle.

Even as Erdogan railed against social media, he added that he did not care about the international response.

Recently Turkey has tightened control of the Internet under the guise of “protecting privacy.”

Freedom House ranks Turkey’s Internet as “Partly Free” in a report that states:

  • Turkish authorities added several thousand websites to its blocking list, increasing the total to almost 30,000.
  • Ruling in favor of a Turkish user, the European Court of Human Rights found Turkey in violation of Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights for blocking access to the hosting platform Google Sites

 

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Filed under Censorship, Corruption, Freedom of Information, Harassment

PA and Hamas Violating Palestinian Press Freedom

Once again Al Jazeera has a great piece on an issue that is not getting a lot of coverage in the U.S. media.

In this case the issue is press freedom in the West Bank and Gaza. Seems the Palestinian Authority and Hamas are engaged in numerous violations of press freedom and harassment and arrests of Palestinian journalists. The charges against the journalists from each government  is pretty much the same: The reporters where asking questions.

Palestinian journalists decry intimidation

The PA and Hamas have committed at least 500 documented press violations since 2007, including arrests, detention, torture, physical violence and censorship, according to the Palestinian Center for Development and Media Freedoms (MADA).

Journalists are consequently forced to work in a political climate that has increasingly “led to the promotion of self-censorship among journalists, and media outlets”, the MADA press release observed.

Rest of story

What Hamas and the PA apparently have not yet figured out is that for there to be a democratic and independent Palestinian state, there has to be free and independent media.

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Filed under Censorship, Harassment, Middle East, Press Freedom

And we thought the White House was choreographed

Great little piece in the New York Times about how the Chinese government tries to fool the world into thinking it run open press conferences.

For Foreign Journalists It’s All About Asking The Right Questions.

For anyone who has ever worked in China or with the Chinese media, this is nothing new. But seeing how most people don’t fit into either category, this story needs wider distribution — especially among journalists.

 

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Filed under Censorship, China

India elections: Some dark clouds on the horizon for journalists

The Committee to Protect Journalists has a great piece on the threats to free press and journalism independence if the current front runner in the Indian elections wins.

Modi’s rise does not bode well for Indian press freedom

Modi, who is serving his fourth term as chief minister of Gujarat, has a history of silencing critical journalists in his home state. In 2006, his administration brought sedition charges against Manoj Shinde, an editor of the Gujarati-language daily Surat Saamna, for criticizing Modi’s handling of a flood, news accounts said. Sedition is punishable by death in India. (It is unclear if the case against Shinde was ever resolved). Two years later, CPJ documented sedition charges brought by Gujarat authorities against an editor and reporter at The Times of India and a photographer at Gujarat Samachar in connection with a series of investigative reports questioning the competency of a high-ranking police officer and his alleged connection to the leader of an organized crime group. The latter charges were eventually quashed in court.

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Filed under India, Press Freedom